Atlantic monthly hook up culture

The reason you feel especially empowered during a hook up--more so than, say, with a vibrator--is because you are not just getting "no strings attached" sex from the hook up as you would with a vibrator , but you are getting it from a living, breathing person.

When feminists do this, it's called empowerment. When men do it, it's called sexual assault.

Crafting a Life that Matters , forthcoming from Crown in January But this analysis [Caitlin Flanagan's in Girl Land ] downplays the unbelievable gains women have lately made, and, more important, it forgets how much those gains depend on sexual liberation. They are more likely to have a college degree and, in aggregate, they make more money.

WHAT GIRLS DO BEFORE HOOKING UP

To put it crudely, feminist progress right now largely depends on the existence of the hookup culture. And to a surprising degree, it is women—not men—who are perpetuating the culture, especially in school, cannily manipulating it to make space for their success, always keeping their own ends in mind.

http://www.juraa.com/images/fandom/the-punk-and-hardcore-youth-subcultures-in-the-usa-since-the-1980s.php

Is the hook-up culture empowering? | The New Criterion

For college girls these days, an overly serious suitor fills the same role an accidental pregnancy did in the 19th century: At Yale I heard stories like the ones I had read in many journalistic accounts of the hookup culture. I really enjoyed it!


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It is also a culture of coercion. According to the Center for Disease Control , around twenty percent of dating relationships have non-sexual violence, and twenty percent of women in college experience completed or attempted rape. Eighty-five percent of these assailants are known, usually boyfriends, ex-boyfriends, or classmates. One might assume that Catholic colleges and universities would shape people differently and thereby generate a different culture.

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After all, these communities have an overarching Christian mission of fostering love of God and others. Moreover, several scientific studies suggest people with greater religious commitment—typically measured by beliefs and additional factors such as worship attendance—report less abuse in relationships , lower rates of drugs and alcohol use, greater success in school, having more engaged parents See Soul Searching , being more engaged in society , being more openly conversant about sex and dating relationships, and are less likely to participate in hook-up culture.

Yet, none of the three studies on dating practices on Catholic colleges and universities found any differences between them and non-religious institutions.


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In Hooking Up , Kathleen Bogle found that students at the Catholic schools responded similarly to the students at the large state school on issues of sex. Moreover, the students at the Catholic school did not see religion having any influence on their behavior. Perhaps the best hope is further research. While the three studies above provide indispensable data, they are just the beginning of the research.

Hook-Up Culture and Catholic Schools

Perhaps the best hope is further research. While the three studies above provide indispensable data, they are just the beginning of the research. Bogle included only one Catholic school and Freitas two.

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Burdette included only a small percentage of women at Catholic schools approximately 55 out of Hopefully, more schools will examine the culture on their campuses to see what is happening and, more importantly, what helps to make the place better. I am hoping not so much for an investigation of individuals and their sexual activities but rather looking how colleges and universities can be more honest about sexual activity, hinder violence, and create a place conducive to the flourishing of students.

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Jason King is Professor of Theology at St. Vincent College in Latrobe, PA. He is also editor of the Journal of Moral Theology. His Faith with Benefits: You can follow him in Twitter kingjasone.